A world separates Judeo-Christianity from Herákleitos ho Ephésios

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From Martin Heidegger’s Introduction to Metaphysics, translated by Gregory Fried and Richard Polt:

[begin quote]
For a more precise account we would have to distinguish here between the synoptic gospels and the gospel of John. But in principle we can say: in the New Testament, from the start, logos does not mean, as in Heraclitus, the Being of beings, the gatheredness of that which contends, but logos means one particular being, namely the Son of God. Furthermore, it means Him in the role of mediator between God and humanity. This New Testament representation of logos is that of the Jewish philosophy of religion which was developed by Philo, in whose doctrine of creation logos is determined as the mesites, the mediator. Why is the mediator logos? Because logos in the Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) is the term for word, “word” in the particular meaning of an order, a commandment; hoi deka logoi are the ten commandments of God (the decalogue). Thus logos means: the keryx, angelos, the messenger, the emissary who transmits commandments and orders; logos tou staurou is the word of the Cross. The announcement of the Cross is Christ Himself; He is the logos of salvation, of eternal life, logos zoes. A world separates all this from Heraclitus.
[end quote]

1 comments on “A world separates Judeo-Christianity from Herákleitos ho Ephésios”

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